Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. That new toothpaste jingle is awfully catchy. Il motivetto play jingle bells nuovo dentifricio non mi esce più dalla testa. Verb not taking a direct object—for example, «She jokes.

The coins jingled in her purse. Le monete tintinnavano nella sua borsetta. Jingle Bells nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. It’s inappropriate to play songs like Jingle Bells in the shops until December.

Vedi la traduzione automatica di Google Translate di ‘jingle’. Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. That new toothpaste jingle is awfully catchy. La canción publicitaria del dentífrico es muy pegadiza. Verb not taking a direct object—for example, «She jokes. The coins jingled in her purse.

Las monedas tintineaban en su cartera. Report an error or suggest an improvement. This sentence is not a translation of the original sentence. La Danza del Venado requiere que se usen muchos cascabeles en los tobillos. Jingle Bells nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. It’s inappropriate to play songs like Jingle Bells in the shops until December. A mi familia le gusta cantar villancicos en las navidades.

No es apropiado poner canciones como Jingle Bells en los comercios hasta diciembre. See Google Translate’s machine translation of ‘jingle’. If you’ve ever visited Japan, you may have noticed a jingle playing to signal the departure of trains at many of the stations — well there’s more to them than just a fun tune. The Japanese take their train system very seriously. Conductors bow to passengers as they enter the train car and companies profusely apologise if trains are only seconds late, or early. Of the 50 busiest train stations in the world, almost all of them are in Japan. One thing that I’ve found strange here is the different melody that plays at every station as the train departs.

They’re known as ‘hassha merodi’ — literally meaning a melody for train departure. It’s a bit of a psychological trick according to Minoru Mukaiya, a composer who’s made jingles for more than 100 Japanese stations. There is a huge number of people who take the train in the metropolitan areas such as Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya and it’s necessary to get people on and off in a short time,» he said. So this helps make organised queues as trains come one after another in a short time. I think trains in other countries are not as crowded as trains in Japan. People know the doors won’t close while the music is playing and it gives comfort to people.

Photo: The Japanese take their train system very seriously. So, what’s the secret to making a good jingle? Firstly, it should be comforting and easy to listen to — Mr Mukaiya uses bells to make sure the jingle jolts people into action without alarming them. Secondly, it’s deliberately done to leave people hanging so they feel the need to get on the train.